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Editorial
The Paradox of Modern Times (2022)

ABOUT Editorial experiments on a broadsheet Theme, guided by Debrah Bishop from the New York Times. CONCEPT Our world is better off now than at any point in human history, but at the same time things have never been worse. The source of our progress has become the source of our downfall. Things are too good for us to change it all, yet too bad for us to leave anything as it is.  The broadsheet  "The paradox of modern times" is an attempt to compare our perception by the media with the often much better reality. 
Would the media ever report all the good developments? - No. It has even been proven that people who consume media on a daily basis are more prone to depression because our "dramatic attention filter" always filters out only the most dramatic news. That's why Swedish author Hans Rosling explained these dramatic instincts and the corresponding "rules of thumb" on which this sheet is based in his book "Factfulness." 
 The sheet itself is designed to be rotated 360 degrees to understand the corresponding "rule of thumb" that exposes and defuses the particular "dramatic instinct."

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This broadsheet is derived from the

book 'Factfulness: Ten Reasons We're Wrong About The World - And Why Things Are Better Than You Think' by the Swedish author and scientist Hans Rosling.

If you haven't already, I highly recommend giving it a read. Click here for the link.

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